Global Financial Integrity

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Transnational Crime

CFT is Meant to Counter Terrorists, Not Democratic Opposition

As Global Financial Integrity’s new report, “Financial Crime in Latin America and the Caribbean,” makes clear, the Western Hemisphere faces a number of security challenges and financial crime threats. The same problems that make the region one...

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Flags of Convenience and the Hazards of Shipbreaking

By Matthew Baur Massive cargo ships are all too familiar to those living in big port cities. These giant vessels deliver goods needed for much of our society to function, from medical supplies and medicines, to food...

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Understanding the Crime-Terror Nexus of Ideologically-Driven Terrorist Organizations

By Brett Bolog Terrorist organizations, driven by political-ideological motivations, require economic resources to finance their operations and expand their influence. These groups often resort to criminal activities, which undermine political stability and push legitimate companies out of...

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Central American Ports: Security Vulnerabilities Threaten Trade

BY NELSON LEONOR Central American ports have long been vulnerable to organized crime and narcotics trafficking, and despite billions of dollars spent attempting to combat the drug trade, a number of recent cases from Guatemala and Honduras...

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Cryptocurrency and the Rise of New Illicit Financial Flows

By Ben Iorio With the rise of Bitcoin and cryptocurrency, the norms for currency have changed. Cryptocurrencies allow transactions to take place with a currency not regulated by any country. In essence, cryptocurrencies are currencies existing completely...

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Anonymous Companies and Transnational Crime

Transnational crimes generate US$1.6 trillion to US$2.2 trillion annually In 2017, Global Financial Integrity (GFI) did a study on transnational crime and found that the combined annual value of 11 different transnational criminal markets was between US$1.6...

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The Serious Impacts of Fisheries Crime

Read Channing Mavrellis’ remarks from the Impacts Panel at the 4th Annual FishCRIME Convention, held in Copenhagen on October 15 and 16, 2018. Channing discusses the impacts of three major crimes that fall under the fisheries crime umbrella, and the need to treat illegal fishing as a serious transnational organized crime.

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The Illegal Wildlife Trade: Sample Retail Market Prices

In the illegal wildlife trade, like all transnational crime, the majority of participants are involved for financial gain. Retailers generally face little enforcement risk while realizing strong profits, as the value of a particular commodity, be it a wild African grey parrot or grams of bear bile, increases dramatically as it makes its way from source to market country.

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